Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Horite Deified Sons

Alice C. Linsley



At the Temple at Dendur  in Nubia two deified sons of a local Nubian chieftain, Pedisi and Pihor are honored. They were the sons of a Medjay ruler. The ancient Egyptians called them "Medjayu." Today they are called Bedja or Beja. They brought gold to Egypt from mines deep in the heartland of Nubia and Kush.

The Bedja are metalworking nomads from the eastern Nubian desert. They were recognized for their military skills and served in the Egyptian army. They policed the desert in the late Old Kingdom. At the end of Egypt's Second Intermediate Period (ca. 1640–1550 B.C.) they played a role in expelling the Hyksos from the Nile Delta. The Medjayu buried their dead in a distinctive way in circular "pan graves" which they marked with the decorated skulls of bulls, gazelles and goats. These have been found in cemeteries of Upper Egypt and Lower Nubia beginning in the Second Intermediate Period. (Source: Sudan 2000–1000 B.C., Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

The Beja (Arabic: البجا‎) are Kushitic people who live in parts of Sudan, Egypt and the Horn of Africa. Their name comes from the ancient Egyptian word for meteroric iron - bja (metal from heaven), and they were metalworkers.

Beja corresponds to the Sanskrit word bija, meaning semen or seed. Meteoritic iron was used in the fabrication of iron beads in Nubia as early as 6000 years ago. These beads may have been perceived as seeds from heaven which brought divine power to the wearer. Meteoritic iron was used in the fabrication of crooks and flails, the symbols of the Egyptian and Kushite pharaohs. These symbols were believed to give the ruler powers from heaven.

Pedisi and Pihor were the deified sons of a Horite ruler-priest.  They held an important place in the Horite temple at Dendur where they are shown with Isis. Ped-Isi means "gift of Isis."  A similar name, Ped-Ashtar, was found at the oldest tomb in Bahariya. Ped-Ashtar was a Horite priest and the grandfather of Zed-Khonsu-efank, the governor of Bahariya.  His wife, Ta-Nefert-Bastet, was the daughter of Ped-Isi, who was called a prophet (pshai).

Pihor was probably Pedisi's half-brother or twin.  His name means "belonging to Hor."  The Horites called Hor the "son of God" as he was conceived of a virgin queen who was overshadowed by the Sun, the emblem of the Creator Re. Hor's mother was called Hathor-Meri (later Isis) and her animal totem was a cow.  She is shown holding her newborn son in a manger or stable. The stable was constructed by the Horite priest Har-si-Atef.  Atef was the crown worn by deified rulers. The Arabic word atef or atif means "kind."  So the Horite ruler who wore the atef crown was to embody kindness.

Ped-Isis and Pi-Hor were the sons of a metalworking ruler of Ku-pr. Kuper means "temple of Kush." The ancient Egyptian word for temple or house was pr.  The Hapiru devotees of Horus called a temple O-piru, meaning "house of the Sun." Azu or Asa is an East African name for God. So Azu-piranu means “house of God” and is equivalent to the Hebrew word "Beth-el."  Horite ruler-priests were called Hapiru in Akkadian Cuneiform and Habiru in the Kushitic languages. The Egyptians called the temple attendants ˁprw, the w being the plural suffix.

Clearly belief in a deified son who would embody kindness and unite the peoples found fulfillment in Jesus Christ, a descendant of the Horite ruler-priests, the divine son of the Virgin Mary, daughter of the priest Joachim of the line of Nathan.  Jesus Christ is the fulfillment of the promise made to Abraham's Horite ancestors in Eden (Gen. 3:15).


Related reading:  Kushite Kings and the Kingdom of GodNilotic-Kushitic Celestial Archetypes; Resurrection as Mirrored RealityAbraham's Mother and Seth's Father; Who Were the Horites?Who Were the Kushites?; Petra Reflects Horite Beliefs; Reality is Cross Shaped


8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Alice,

I have a question, I was hoping you had the answer to.

Would an inter-sex person be able to be a priest?

If a person has a female chromosome, but male reproductive organs?

Do chromosomes have anything to do with the priesthood?


Savvy

Alice C. Linsley said...

As politically incorrect as this will sound - the answer is no. Consider what the priest represents: an icon of Christ, the perfect Man.

Further, in bringing offerings before the Lord in His temple only the best, the first, the most perfect were to be presented. No blemishes and no anomalies such as you describe.

Anonymous said...

Thanks Alice.

Why do I feel like Armageddon is now being fought over this issue?

Savvy

Anonymous said...

Alice,

Why don't you write a book on this subject. There are so many anti-books written.

Savvy

Alice C. Linsley said...

The gender continuum lie is being pushed by the maintstream media and in the universities and publis schools. Frankly, I'm surprised I still have a job at the college where I teach because I refuse to go there and I make my students question ideological junk.

A book on this topic would be atoward the bottom of my list, I'm afraid. At this point there are at least 4 books ahead of it. Still, I agree that there nees to be a solid book on the topic that lifts up the fallacies of this thinking.

Anonymous said...

Alice,

I am indebted to you for all the work that you have put into this subject. It's helping us all learn so much.

Thanks,

Savvy

Anonymous said...

Iron is baja in Malaysian. There was a iron-making Hindu kingdom in Kedah at Bujang valley there. Interestingly, a photo shows of the site shows a building foundation of a square-circle, which I think was the form of the merkhaba, a drumwheel, used to move stone blocks for temples and pyramids. http://www.freemalaysiatoday.com/2011/09/10/kedah-not-malacca-the-oldest-kingdom/

Coin with central square, Vietnam:
http://www.southeastasianarchaeology.com/2011/10/04/nguyen-dynasty-tay-son-dynasty-thoai-ngoc-hau/

DDeden

Alice C. Linsley said...

Thanks, DDeden. That is fascinating! The Horim spread their Nilotic religion across the ancient Afro-Asiatic Dominion, as evidenced by falcon-shaped fire altars and images of Re and his son Hor at shrines and temples as far from the Nile as Anghor Wat in Cambodia.